Prints & Posters items by Yellowhair, Robert

  • Navajo Wedding Basket by Robert Yellowhair
    Synopsis:
     
         Navajo wedding baskets have many purposes. Every basket has a series of rings that run through the basket's story and tells you what the basket is used for. Baskets with four rings are for weddings. Two rings represent the promises a man makes to a woman, the other two represent the promise the woman makes to the man. There are only three rings in "Navajo Wedding Basket" it is still called a wedding basket but in the painting is being used for a healing ceremony because the three rings means that no promises have been made.
         There are two Holy prayers that can never be recorded that are performed by the Native American Church to heal people with internal injuries. The living Way takes medicine from the earth and baptizes the sick person in corn pollen. The Holy Way uses an hour and a half long prayer sung and repeated to teach the sick to pray for them-selves while appealing to the gods. The prayer fan is adorned with the symbol of the universe where the gods come from and the two feathers that represent the gods they pray to, The Monster-Slayer and Born-for-Water.
         The squash blossom necklace is highly valued by Navajo women but so is the red sash that lies in the basket. During the birthing process a sash is wrapped around the mother's waist and a second is tied to the ceiling. Navajo women sit up during birth and use the sash to lift themselves up while the two midwives assist with the birthing. The "Navajo Wedding Basket" represents the long history of the medicine man and the tools he uses to heal his people.
     
                                                                            Synopsis: Tiffany Anderson
     
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  • Sky Walk by Robert Yellowhair
    Synopsis:
          The Hunter rolled over on his dirt bed, locked his hands together and cradled his head as he looked at the stars shining high above the canyon walls. The day had been long following the path of the Anasazi down into the mouth of the world carrying the rocks needed to build the great sweat bath. Today they built and prayed; tomorrow they would pray then hunt.
          The Hunter closed his eyes and inhaled a deep breath of the wilderness holding it in his lungs until his ears rattled like the guards of the Kachina. Tomorrow he will offer his prayer to the great hunter The Serpent whispering his prayer into the Zuni fetish bowl where Serpent would find it. Ram was what he was after and Serpent knew how to hunt Ram.
         'The Hunter will pray to Wolf, Mountain Lion, and Bear, acknowledging their powers. He knows tomorrow he will need the strength of Bear, the speed of Mountain Lion, and at the right time the killer instinct of Wolf. But to know how the land speaks, to know where to hide and when to circle behind The Hunter needs The Serpent. Serpent the greatest hunter who uses his mind. Serpent knows where to wait. Serpent knows how to hunt Ram.
         Turning his head from the stars The Hunter watches Deer Kachina fly across the sunset to the skywalk above. He cannot see the great Kachina Chief and his acolyte in his coat of many colors. But deep down in his blood The Hunter knows they have drawn the mark; to X the ground to transform the Kachina spirits into mortal flesh. The Hunter rests his head back into his hands and listens to the music of the spirit world listening to the eerie song they sing. He knows they will bless him with their staff and he knows when the sun rises he will once again hear the Kachina song in mortal form where he can understand their words.
         The Hunter closes his eyes and hears the spirit song climb higher away from the camp of hunters into the skywalk above and falls into a deep sleep, dreaming of the trophies he will leave at the trophy tree. Ram, The Hunter thought before he left the spirit world and let his body rest for the day to hunt, to come.
     
                                                                                  Synopsis by: Tiffany Anderson
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  • Walapi Harvest by Robert Yellowhair

     

    Synopsis:
     
         The people of Walapi rest, the shrine was covered in feathers, the prayers written on smoker were stored in the Zuni fetish bowl and the sun was setting. Night is the time for spirits. Night is when the spirits will come, the spirits own the night but if you tie your feather to a stick and place it in the shrine if it is taken, by morning you will receive the blessings of the thirty two harvest kachina.
         The great Chief visits Walapi and places his X on the ground to be blessed by his lieutenant.
         While they work prayers are sent directly to the home of all kachina the San Francisco Peak. Heading the call all thirty two kachina, each representing one of the many fruits or plants naturally harvested in The First Mesa region come. With them they bring beans, squash, spinach, and corn to the faithful of Walapi. Deer and Antelope Kachina come to the harvest shrine and step on the powered markings to give their gifts to the people.
         When the people of Walapi wake their feathers have been taken and in their place a bounty of prosperity waits for the people to enjoy.
     
                                                                              Synopsis: Tiffany Anderson
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