Original Artwork items by Yellowhair, Robert

  • Apache Friendship Basket by Robert Yellowhair
     
     
         This original oil painting Titled: Apache Friendship Basket, will be shipped from the Artist: Robert Yellowhair.
     
     
     
     
     
    Note:
     
           The image shown is of a print. The actual painting will not have the second signature and print info.
     
    Synopsis:
     
         The "Apache Friendship Basket" features a Hopi water vase which contains a prayer for family.
         The Apache basket has two medicine men at the front surrounded by the pictographs of home and water. Four dancers and a clown stand in the basket. The clown holds a thunder stick which is traditionally used in Apache rain ceremonies. The three feathered prayer fan with its four prayer sticks on the handle are commonly used in the Native American Church during their peyote ceremonies.
         Turquoise is considered the most beautiful stone by the Navajo culture. If a diamond and a turquoise were set side by side many Navajo women will choose to adorn themselves in the colorful stone. As a young man Robert's grandfather was sold as a slave and taken to the east, when he returned home he brought crushed shells to use in his medicine and large shells to adorn his family. The shell combined with the turquoise necklace represents beauty and love.
     
                                                                         Synopsis: Tiffany Anderson
     
     
    $0.00
    Artist(s)
  • Navajo Wedding Basket by Robert Yellowhair
     
         This original oil painting Titled: Navajo Wedding Basket, will be shipped from the Artist: Robert Yellowhair.
     
     
     
    Note:
     
           The image shown is of a print. The actual painting will not have the second signature and print info.
     
    Synopsis:
     
         Navajo wedding baskets have many purposes. Every basket has a series of rings that run through the basket's story and tells you what the basket is used for. Baskets with four rings are for weddings. Two rings represent the promises a man makes to a woman, the other two represent the promise the woman makes to the man. There are only three rings in "Navajo Wedding Basket" it is still called a wedding basket but in the painting is being used for a healing ceremony because the three rings means that no promises have been made.
         There are two Holy prayers that can never be recorded that are performed by the Native American Church to heal people with internal injuries. The living Way takes medicine from the earth and baptizes the sick person in corn pollen. The Holy Way uses an hour and a half long prayer sung and repeated to teach the sick to pray for them-selves while appealing to the gods. The prayer fan is adorned with the symbol of the universe where the gods come from and the two feathers that represent the gods they pray to, The Monster-Slayer and Born-for-Water.
         The squash blossom necklace is highly valued by Navajo women but so is the red sash that lies in the basket. During the birthing process a sash is wrapped around the mother's waist and a second is tied to the ceiling. Navajo women sit up during birth and use the sash to lift themselves up while the two midwives assist with the birthing. The "Navajo Wedding Basket" represents the long history of the medicine man and the tools he uses to heal his people.
     
                                                                            Synopsis: Tiffany Anderson
     
     
    $0.00
    Artist(s)
  • New Kachina by Robert Yellowhair
     
     
         This original oil painting Titled: New Kachina, will be shipped from the Artist: Robert Yellowhair.
     
     
     
     
     
    Note:
     
           The image shown is of a print. The actual painting will not have the second signature and print info.
     
    Synopsis:
     
         In Native American art an artist is held by many restrictions of what he can create and how it can be represented. Some rules in place are to keep the sacred secrets safe. Mostly what an artist can create is limited by the rights bestowed by their clan. On his travels Robert met a Hopi man who became enraged when he saw Roberts painting of "Red Beard Kachina" he said, "You have no right to paint the Red Beard Kachina."
         Robert looked at the man and said, "I am from Zuni decent. My Grandmother was stolen by the Navajo. It is you that has no right to tell me that I cannot paint it." As an artist Robert has been approved to paint many images that are out of the reach of other artists. Due to his talent, today we get to experience the work of the "Red Hair Kachina."
         Seventy years ago a young halfblooded Zuni boy dreamed of a kachina with a long red beard.
         Wanting to know why he was dreaming of such a man he went to see his medicine man. "If you want to know the meaning behind your dream you must fast, then go into the wilderness. Driven by his desire to understand the hidden meaning behind his dream the little boy went into the woods after four days without food or water. When he returned he told the medicine man about the new kachina that is half Zuni and half White Hippie. The Long Hair Kachina was a new messenger for the gods and a bringer of the harvest, foretelling of good trade and good future. Long Hair Kachina is a young god who represents the imperishable spirit of the Zuni and has been accepted into the Native American Pantheon as a harbinger of change and good things to come.
     
                                                                         Synopsis: Tiffany Anderson
     
     
    $0.00
    Artist(s)
  • Sky Walk by Robert Yellowhair
     
         This original oil painting Titled: Sky Walk, will be shipped from the Artist: Robert Yellowhair.
     
     
     
     
    Note:
     
           The image shown is of a print. The actual painting will not have the second signature and print info.
     
    Synopsis:
          The Hunter rolled over on his dirt bed, locked his hands together and cradled his head as he looked at the stars shining high above the canyon walls. The day had been long following the path of the Anasazi down into the mouth of the world carrying the rocks needed to build the great sweat bath. Today they built and prayed; tomorrow they would pray then hunt.
          The Hunter closed his eyes and inhaled a deep breath of the wilderness holding it in his lungs until his ears rattled like the guards of the Kachina. Tomorrow he will offer his prayer to the great hunter The Serpent whispering his prayer into the Zuni fetish bowl where Serpent would find it. Ram was what he was after and Serpent knew how to hunt Ram.
         'The Hunter will pray to Wolf, Mountain Lion, and Bear, acknowledging their powers. He knows tomorrow he will need the strength of Bear, the speed of Mountain Lion, and at the right time the killer instinct of Wolf. But to know how the land speaks, to know where to hide and when to circle behind The Hunter needs The Serpent. Serpent the greatest hunter who uses his mind. Serpent knows where to wait. Serpent knows how to hunt Ram.
         Turning his head from the stars The Hunter watches Deer Kachina fly across the sunset to the skywalk above. He cannot see the great Kachina Chief and his acolyte in his coat of many colors. But deep down in his blood The Hunter knows they have drawn the mark; to X the ground to transform the Kachina spirits into mortal flesh. The Hunter rests his head back into his hands and listens to the music of the spirit world listening to the eerie song they sing. He knows they will bless him with their staff and he knows when the sun rises he will once again hear the Kachina song in mortal form where he can understand their words.
         The Hunter closes his eyes and hears the spirit song climb higher away from the camp of hunters into the skywalk above and falls into a deep sleep, dreaming of the trophies he will leave at the trophy tree. Ram, The Hunter thought before he left the spirit world and let his body rest for the day to hunt, to come.
     
                                                                                  Synopsis by: Tiffany Anderson
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    Artist(s)
  • Spider Rock by Robert Yellowhair
     
         This original oil painting Titled: Spider Rock, will be shipped from the Artist: Robert Yellowhair.
     
     
     
    Note:
     
           The image shown is of a print. The actual painting will not have the second signature and print info.
     
    Synopsis:
     
         Kesha walked the South Rim. The sun rose behind Spider Rock and tall needles gouged the sky and hid in the light. The Spider Woman watched her come.
         At Spider Rock in the Canyon de Chelly lives Spider Woman the spiritual Grandmother of the Dine' People who endowed Kesha, a young Navajo girl, with a great power. Spider Woman invited Kesha into her home and fed her. While Kesha ate Grandmother said, "Kesha you need to change you rags, I will make you a beautiful dress." Spider Woman ran seven hundred and fifty feet to the top of Spider Rock and gathered her cotton. With eight legs she wove the dress in just a few minutes. "Next," Spider Woman said, "you need moccasins, then a head tie, rugs, purses and belts." Everything Kesha needed even the knowledge of how to weave herself was given to her. Before the sun set Kesha had mastered the weaving and Grandmother Spider Woman sent Kesha home. When she arrived home her poor family did not recognize her. Kesha was resplendently dressed, confident in her weaving skill, and she was beautiful.
         "I am Kesha," she cried, "I am one of the Dine'." Yet they could not believe that the little girl who left this morning in rags was now so beautiful.
         "Where have you been? What did you do?"
         "I spent the day with my spirit Grandmother Spider Woman. She taught me how to weave."
    Kesha's family recognized her. She taught them the art of weaving so it could be passed down through generations and become famous with all the nations.
         "Spider Rock" is the creative interpretation of all the tribes of the Southwest's acknowledging and celebrating the gift given to Kesha. They circle the seven hundred and fifty foot spindle working together to weave as the eight armed Spider Woman weaves .

                                                                         Synopsis: Tiffany Anderson

     

     

     

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    Artist(s)
  • Walapi Harvest by Robert Yellowhair
         This original oil painting Titled: Walapi Harvest, will be shipped from the Artist: Robert Yellowhair.
     
     
     
     
    Note:
     
           The image shown is of a print. The actual painting will not have the second signature and print info.
     
    Synopsis:
     
         The people of Walapi rest, the shrine was covered in feathers, the prayers written on smoker were stored in the Zuni fetish bowl and the sun was setting. Night is the time for spirits. Night is when the spirits will come, the spirits own the night but if you tie your feather to a stick and place it in the shrine if it is taken, by morning you will receive the blessings of the thirty two harvest kachina.
         The great Chief visits Walapi and places his X on the ground to be blessed by his lieutenant.
         While they work prayers are sent directly to the home of all kachina the San Francisco Peak. Heading the call all thirty two kachina, each representing one of the many fruits or plants naturally harvested in The First Mesa region come. With them they bring beans, squash, spinach, and corn to the faithful of Walapi. Deer and Antelope Kachina come to the harvest shrine and step on the powered markings to give their gifts to the people.
         When the people of Walapi wake their feathers have been taken and in their place a bounty of prosperity waits for the people to enjoy.
     
                                                                              Synopsis: Tiffany Anderson
     
     

     

    $0.00
    Artist(s)
  • Wedding Set by Robert Yellowhair
     
          This original oil painting Titled: Sky Walk, will be shipped from the Artist: Robert Yellowhair.
     
     
     
     
    Note:
     
           The image shown is of a print. The actual painting will not have the second signature and print info.
     
    Synopsis:

     

         "Wedding Set" is a beautiful fusion between the Paiute and Navajo culture. Marriage is a compromise that needs to be made to form a lasting union. A young Paiute girl was stolen and raised by the Navajo. When she was old enough to marry she wanted to marry a Navajo man. In the Navajo culture a wedding vase is used to share water and baptize each other. Being of the Paiute people the little girl wanted to have a wedding basket. She spoke to her intended and a compromise was made. “Weave a basket," said the man. We will honor both your clan and mine.
         The wedding vase has the prayer of long life and shows the separation of two people coming together under the arch of the handle to become one. It is shown with the wedding basket that the Paiute girl wove. Together they designed the Navajo wedding basket according to the Navajo religion but held the tradition of the Paiute that allowed her to marry the Navajo man. The woman wove the history of the creation of the world into the basket with four rings running through the pictographs. Today each of the rings represents a secret promise the couple makes with each other.
         The union of the wedding vase and the Navajo wedding basket brings together two histories two clans and old and new traditions.
     
                                                                       Synopsis: Tiffany Anderson
     
     
    $0.00
    Artist(s)
  • Yucca Coil Basket by Robert Yellowhair
     
         This original oil painting Titled: Yucca Coil Basket, will be shipped from the Artist: Robert Yellowhair.
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Note:
     
           The image shown is of a print. The actual painting will not have the second signature and print info.
     
    Synopsis:

          Grandmother and Granddaughter lived at First Mesa, Walapi. Granddaughter said, "I am bored.
          There is nothing to do around here." So the Grandmother sent her lazy granddaughter down to the bottom of the mesa to collect a yucca plant. From the plant the Grandmother started making the yucca coil basket. Over the course of three days they dried and died the strands they would use to make the basket.
          As they worked grandmother told the story that she wove into the basket of Crow Mother who had been married four times but had no children. In desperation she prayed to the Great Spirit who answered her prayer in a dream. "When you wake you will find something in the doorway as a gift for being faithful."
          When Crow Mother woke she found a wet ball of red mud in her doorway. Unable to see how a ball of mud was a gift she asked the Great Spirit, "This is my gift? A ball of mud?"
    The Great Spirit answered, "Make some dolls." Crow Mother went to work and started making dolls. When she was finished the Great Spirit breathed life into them and they became her little children. The story of Crow Mother is celebrated today when little children run around the village before ceremonies begin proudly calling themselves mudheads.
     
                                                                       Synopsis: Tiffany Anderson
     
     
    $0.00
    Artist(s)