Creek

  • Fred Beaver _ A Seminole Family
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    $0.00
    Artist(s)
  • Jerome Richard Tiger _ Agony
     
    Agony' invokes a feeling of intense sadness that clutches at the heart. Tiger uses a mixture of blue on blue for a mood of stark misery. The painting is at once warm and cold. There is a feeling of cold despair and yet the emotion being felt by the man brings forth sympathy in the viewer who has suffered loss or grief.
     
     
     
     

     

    $0.00
    Artist(s)
  • Jonny Hawk _ Always Indian Time
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    $0.00
    Artist(s)
  • Jerome Richard Tiger _ Departure

    Death to Jerome was the prelude to eternal life. He envisioned the end of the physical body as merely the event that enabled the spirit to free itself. There was no sorrow. Jerome viewed death as the final climactic achievement. The young warrior has died in battle, yet the painting does not evoke sadness, but is a triumphant statement of the undying spirit of man. Although the theme is portrayed with an Indian warrior, it is universal in its appeal-representing all who have tried to find comfort in the face of death and defeat, and who maintqain hope for life after death.

    $0.00
    Artist(s)
  • Jerome Richard Tiger _ His Spirit Calls

    "His Spirit Calls", the seventh release in the Connoisseur's Series, is based on a favorite theme of Tiger's and one that is ever popular with people the world over. It is the belief that the spirit does not end with the death of the physical body, but continues to survive. The Plains Indian Tribes were a very spiritual people, and before their contact with the Christian missionaries they customarily placed their dead on scaffolds similar to those in the foreground of the painting. Their belief was that the body should be placed between this world and the spiritual world to lessen the distance that the spirit would have to travel. This awareness of the spiritual world, the unseen, was as much a part of Tiger as the tangible structures of his daily existence. He believed in a force greater than himself that guided his work and his life. Tiger's feelings of the ethereal are unmistakeable in the painting "His Spirit Calls". In Tiger's version, the Great Spirit is calling his warriors home.

    $0.00
    Artist(s)
  • Jerome Richard Tiger _ Little Arrow Fixer (Plate 2)
    Jerome Richard Tiger _ Innocent (Plate 1)
    Jerome Richard Tiger _ Innocent And Little Arrow Fixer (Cover)
     
         This is a diptich print (a set of two prints). Plate 1 is Innocent, Plate 2 is Little Arrow Fixer. Click on the image to see both plates.
         Innocent: A mother gently embraces her older child, who kneels beside her, while tenderly cradling her baby. The mother seems to be looking deep into the youngster's face as if to examine his motives. Possibly the child has be mischievous, but the mother's love, strong and reassuring, looks beyond the boyish crime and sees the good natured, youthful spirit beneath, Thus the verdict is "Innocent". Little Arrow Fixer: Tiger often used family and friends for models and called upon true-to-life situations for many of his themes. The innocence and beauty of children always facinated him, and he was at his best in isolating a moment of time in a child's imaginative world. Working intently to repair his arrows, the "Little Arrow Fixer" with his round tummy, knock-knees, and pigeon-toes, is in a world unto himself. The exaggerated feather and the enormous bow, nearly twice the height of the small boy, are examples of Tiger's humor.
     
     
     
     
     
    $0.00
    Artist(s)
  • Jerome Richard Tiger _ Intermission

    In the second of the Cultural Series, "Intermission", Jerome Tiger captures a moment of rest between stomp dances. The stomp dance is a 'prayer in motion'. It can symbolize thankfulness, supplication for a good harvest, rain, fertility or simply blessings. Typically the dances last through the night, sometimes continuting for days. Needless to say periods of rest and refreshment are neceessary; therefore, "Intermission". The stomp dances are unique in that they are not 'tourist' dances, for they are performed still today in the seclusion of the backwoods. The dancers dance in a circle around an open fire to a plaintive chant intoned by the leader and answered in unison by the dancers. The dances are accompanied by persistent drum beats and the rhythmic sounds of rock-filled turtle shells strapped to the womens' ankles. There is great artistry required in leading the chants, and the best leaders and dancers are awarded a postiion of high respect. Of particular interest in this painting is the adoption of the white man's apparel -- boots, jeans, and hats -- together with traditional Indian dress, symbolizing a subtle integration of the two cultures.

    $0.00
    Artist(s)
  • Fred Beaver _ Leaving For The Trading Post
    This colorful print depicts a couple leaving for the trading post.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    $0.00
    Artist(s)
  • Jerome Richard Tiger _ Never Get Away

    "Never Get Away" is the third painting reproduced in the Cultural Series. It follows "Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow" and "Intermission". The paintings in this series often have a brown background. The figures appear to fade into the canvass in some places, and stand out in stark relief in others. This concept originated with Tiger, and the style is unique. As the name of the series implies, these paintings have a cultural theme; each depicts the Creek Tribe in everyday life, and is accurate as to clothing and activities. "Never Get Away" goes back to the period when Oklahoma was Indian Territory. This was a time when the tribes governed themselves. The Light Horesemen were Indian police who kept law and order within the tribe. The title "Never Get Away" describes the painting well. The Light Horseman is doing his job, has caught his man, and is ready to bring him to justice. It may be noted that the 'Indian way' was not prison. That was the white man's innovation. The Indian traditionally punished his own with banishment, whippings or death. Cultural ties were so strong that the so called prisoner was not jailed, but was expected to wait until punishment was netted out.

    $0.00
    Artist(s)
  • Jerome Richard Tiger _ Peace Offering
     
    The painted warrior lays aside his weapons in the exchange for the peace pipe, symbolizing the transition in the way of life for the Indian.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    $0.00
    Artist(s)